Thursday, 5 June 2014

Digital Divide alternative solution to Project Loon's atmospheric balloons is also a Plan B from Google using many small LEO satellites

After experimenting successfully with Project Loon's high altitude balloons, Google is now also looking to use a fleet of low-earth-orbit satellites to bring Internet access to remote regions of the world.


The company plans to spend between US$1 billion and US$3 billion to initially bring 180 high-capacity satellites into orbit at lower altitudes than traditional satellites, the Wall Street Journal reported citing people familiar with the matter. The number of satellites used could double during the project.



The project is said to be led by Greg Wyler, the founder of satellite company O3b networks, who recently joined Google with O3b's former CTO, according to the Wall Street Journal. The project aims to overcome financial and technical problems that hindered earlier efforts, the newspaper said.



Google-backed O3b Networks launched its first satellites that aim to provide low-cost and high-speed connectivity to remote parts of the world in June 2013.



After experimenting with high altitude balloons, Google is now also looking to use a fleet of low-earth-orbit satellites to bring Internet access to remote regions of the world.



The company plans to spend between US$1 billion and US$3 billion to initially bring 180 high-capacity satellites into orbit at lower altitudes than traditional satellites, the Wall Street Journal reported Sunday citing people familiarAfter experimenting successfully with Project Loon's high altitude balloons, Google is now also looking to use a fleet of low-earth-orbit satellites to bring Internet access to remote regions of the world.



The company plans to spend between US$1 billion and US$3 billion to initially bring 180 high-capacity satellites into orbit at lower altitudes than traditional satellites, the Wall Street Journal reported citing people familiar with the matter. The number of satellites used could double during the project.

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